‘Indian Matchmaking’ wastes the opportunity to become a wonderful show about human connections

Sushmita Pathak. Is it a match? A potential couple meet up courtesy of a matchmaker in the Netflix series Indian Matchmaking. Netflix hide caption. A picky year-old from Mumbai whose unwillingness to marry raises his mom’s blood pressure. A headstrong year-old lawyer from Houston who says she doesn’t want to settle for just anybody. A cheerful year-old Guyanese-American dancer with Indian roots who simply wants to find a good person to be her husband.

Mumbai Matrimony

Sima Aunty or Sima Tarapia, the woman with the starring role in the docu-series Indian Matchmaking, is being called the stuff of nightmares. The Netflix show is meant to be a behind-the-scenes look at how arranged matches are orchestrated. How much did Indian Matchmaking get right, what did the show get wrong, and how much did they leave out altogether?

Consisting an easy to binge-watch eight episodes, the show follows Mumbai’s self-confessed “best matchmaker” Sima Taparia as she weighs.

Unsolicited comments assumed I was gay or bisexual, and urged me to come out of the closet. What is an idea flow? A flow is a trance like state in which other things don’t seem to exist or become inconsequential. An idea flow is a similar thought process with an idea. And I tend to walk in circles till the time I don’t complete the whole vision of the idea. Always wanting to experiment with my favourite dish, sushi.

I thought why not reimagine a sushi. First problem solving thought process was how can I make a sushi in a drink; put a sushi, use the signature ingredients or simply accompany it with sushi. Finalizing on using the same ingredients of a sushi, I wanted to create a drink equally simple and distinct as each ingredient tastes in a sushi. Wanted the cocktail to taste differently at each level hence needed to create barriers. First was wasabi and salt, initially was scared will be too strong for the drink, but the right application has been a refreshing addition to my cocktail palate.

Simply adding them always adds a mouthful of flavour.

Is ‘Indian Matchmaking’ realistic? Four UAE couples on how arranged marriages are evolving

Combination photograph of Pradhyuman in the show Indian matchmaking L and photograph shared on Humans of Bombay. Netflix’s show ‘ Indian Matchmaking ‘ which recently hit the OTT platform, managed to get the social media talking. Aimed at showing a peak in desi “culture” and how arranged matches are “arranged” by matchmakers Sima Aunty from Mumbai, in this case using bio-data and interests of potential candidates, the show became a cringewatch for many.

Binge-watchers came down hard on the showmakers, calling out the alleged casteism, sexism, colourism among many things involved in the show that irked them immensely.

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By Naman Ramachandran. Netflix launched in India in , and homegrown commissions became available from in a market that thrives on local fare. They were replaced eventually by Monika Shergill in , who joined existing director of originals Srishti Behl Arya. The same year, the Los Angeles-based Mundhra pitched her idea for an Indian dating show with a global-facing matchmaker to Netflix in the U.

Over in India, Netflix — trailing behind turbocharged local streamers and global rival Amazon Prime Video — was trying to grow its customer base by trialling cheap subscriptions.

Even as the Netflix show “Indian Matchmaking” has grown into a matchmaker Sima Taparia as she jets between Mumbai and the U.S. to.

Taparia manned the dating show as she found potential matches for her eligible clients, served with a dash of sass. The Indian Matchmaking star has now revealed how she too, met her husband Anup via traditional matchmaking. But, it was an entirely different scenario for the matchmaker herself when she tied the knot with Anup Taparia 37 years ago. Taparia in Indian Matchmaking made Taparia into an overnight superstar.

Today, Taparia has a 24, follower base on Instagram to whom she spoke about her own matchmaking process. She revealed how back then, Anup was still in his final year of graduation and she was residing with her family in Gulbarga, now known as Kalaburagi in the Indian state of Karnataka. It was December of ’82 when we got engaged.

‘Can’t Men be Beautiful?’ Pradhyuman of ‘Indian Matchmaking’ Reacts to Questions on His Sexuality

Her fame or infamy, depending on how you view it, has been something she has chased for a long time, ever since she was a little girl growing up in the small town of Gulbarga in Karnataka. It was an arranged marriage at the tender age of 19 that put her dreams on hold. And fittingly for her, it is a series about arranged marriages that has made the dreams of the little girl from Gulbarga come true. The docu-reality series that has been all the rage for the last few days chronicles the stories of seven people looking for love, companionship and someone to get married to.

Aimed at showing a peak in desi “culture” and how arranged matches are “​arranged” by matchmakers (Sima Aunty from Mumbai, in this case).

Five years ago, I met with a matchmaker. I went in scornful. Like many of my progressive South Asian peers, I denounced arranged marriage as offensive and regressive. But when the matchmaker recited her lengthy questionnaire, I grasped, if just for a beat, why people did things this way. Do you believe in a higher power? No idea. Should your partner share your creative interests? Must read, though preferably not write, novels. Do you want children?

Not particularly. The show has received sharp criticism — some well deserved — among progressive South Asians, including Dalit writers , for normalizing the casteist, sexist and colorist elements of Indian society. It explores the fact that many Indian millennials and their diaspora kin still opt for match-made marriage. The show reveals conversations that take place behind closed doors, making desis confront our biases and assumptions, while inviting non-desis to better understand our culture.

The series, which was produced by the Oscar-nominated documentary filmmaker Smriti Mundhra, presents people who want to find a middle way between parentally arranged marriage and contemporary dating.

Indian Matchmaking – A Joke Made In Mumbai

The Netflix hit “Indian Matchmaking” has stirred up conversations about issues like parental preference in marriage, cultural progress, casteism — and ghosting. Taparia answered questions via email from Mumbai, discussing why none of the matches worked out, her own arranged marriage and how business is booming despite the coronavirus pandemic.

Sima Taparia: They are not separate things. Matchmaking is just a tool to help people find a life partner. In India, the process also often involves parents. Has the show generated new interest in matchmaking with more people wanting to do it?

Sima Taparia is the matchmaker on Netflix’s new dating show, ‘Indian originally started matchmaking, she initially kept it in the Mumbai area.

The show, which has generated a lot of buzz online, follows Sima Taparia, a high-profile matchmaker from Mumbai who sets couples up with prospective matches. While the show has triggered a debate on sexism, colourism and racism, it has managed to throw the spotlight on the age-old Indian custom of arranged marriage. Over the last two decades, several Bollywood films and reality TV shows have explored the concept of arranged marriages in their own way and have done justice to the theme.

The show is about the central figure, Aneela Rahman, a Glasgow based British-Asian marriage arranger, who gets her family and friends to network together and find the perfect partner for the contestants in a four-week period. The episodes end with updates on how the matches are or not getting on. The show lasted only one season and had five episodes.

Dimpy from Kolkata went on to win the show and married Mahajan in a televised ceremony. The two, however, split next year and filed for divorce soon after. Are arranged marriages doomed from the start and bound to end in divorce? Or is there some hope for the age-old marriage union that can make modern romance work?

Netflix’s ‘Indian Matchmaking’ is only too accurate

Sima Taparia is an Marriage Consultant living in Mumbai. Her name is known to almost every high profile Marwari family in India as well as in other parts of the world. Born to an industrial and famous family of Late Shri Rameshchandra Lahoti of Gulbarga, has had a passion of maintaining and recalling relationships since childhood. At a young age of 19 she was married to Anup Taparia, industrial group of Mumbai having business interest in hand tools, magnets, textiles, pharmaceuticals and exports.

Since Lahoti and Taparia group have a vast network of family, she had a big opportunity of meeting the family members and learning new relationships. Finding the relation with an unknown person is her passion which she does in minutes.

The show follows Sima Taparia, a professional matchmaker from Mumbai, as she jets around the world, quizzing clients on their preferences.

Critics accuse the show of stereotyping and commodifying women, lacking diversity and promoting a backwards vision of marriage where astrologers and meddling parents are more influential than the preferences of brides and grooms. They complain that the series, which follows matchmaker Sima Taparia as she jets between Mumbai and the U. In fact, the real problem may be their discomfort with the way marriage works in India, with social stability prized over individual happiness.

A small fraction still practices child marriage, with some communities holding betrothal ceremonies as soon as a girl is born. At the other end of the spectrum, there is growing acceptance of queer relationships, divorce and even avoiding marriage altogether. But most Indian marriages are still arranged. Even college-educated, urban, middle-class Indians show a strong preference to marry within caste. Muslims in South Asia marry within their biradari or jaat — a stand-in for Hindu caste.

The reason Guyanese-born Nadia faces a limited set of options in the show is not because of her South American birth, but because Indians who were shipped as indentured laborers to the New World were mostly lower castes, or so perceived. When the purpose of marriage is to find love, companionship and compatibility, then the focus is on the characteristics of the individual. The marriage market is akin to a matching market, similar to Tinder or Uber. But, in a world where marriage exists to maintain caste lines, the nature of the marriage market more closely resembles a commodity market, where goods are graded into batches.

Within every batch, the commodity is substitutable — as in wheat or coffee exchanges.

Brahmin – Bengali Mumbai Matrimony

The Mumbai-based matchmaker Sima Taparia delivers this meme-friendly one-liner in the seventh episode of the hit Netflix series Indian Matchmaking. But she departs from this well-worn model in her attention to one extra characteristic: caste. This silent shadow hangs over every luxurious living room she leads viewers into.

She lumps an entire social system, which assigns people to a fixed place in a hierarchy from birth, together with anodyne physical preferences. This prejudiced treatment includes, but is hardly limited to, workplace discrimination in the United States.

As the Mumbai-based matchmaker, Sima Taparia guides her clients in the U.S, and in India, we get to witness the journey of milennials.

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